[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1939

MOUSE BRAIN ANTIGEN: INTRAVENOUS USE IN DIAGNOSIS OF LYMPHOGRANULOMA VENEREUM

Author Affiliations

ALLENTOWN, PA.; NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, New York University College of Medicine, and the Dermatologic Service of Bellevue Hospital, service of Dr. Edward R. Maloney.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1939;40(3):397-401. doi:10.1001/archderm.1939.01490030054008
Abstract

Hellerström1 in 1931 first reported that the intravenous injection of Frei antigen prepared with human pus was followed by a typical febrile response in patients with lymphogranuloma venereum. A similar reaction was not produced in control subjects. Ravaut, Levaditi and Maisler2 injected monkey brain antigen intravenously. They stated that patients with lymphogranuloma venereum react to intravenous injection of antigen while the intradermal Frei test is still negative. Gay Prieto and Egea Bueno3 and Flandin and Turiaf4 reported in favor of its diagnostic value. Findlay5 expressed the belief that the intravenous test is dangerous. Wlassics6 found that 30 per cent of his control subjects, chiefly patients with tuberculosis of the skin, gave a positive reaction.

The difference in the reports of some of the investigators may be accounted for by differences in potency and amount of antigen used. The question of patients with mixed infections

×