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Article
December 1939

INFLUENCE OF AGE ON RINGWORM INFECTION OF THE SCALP: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.; CORVALLIS, ORE.

From the University of Oregon Medical School (Dr. Kingery) and from the Department of Chemistry, Oregon State Agricultural College (Dr. Williams and Mr. Kidd).

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1939;40(6):879-886. doi:10.1001/archderm.1939.01490060017002
Abstract

Ringworm of the scalp in children is a commonplace clinical observation. Its low incidence in the years following puberty and in late adult life, at least in Europe and America,1 is equally well known and to date has no adequate explanation. From time to time various theories have been offered, including the differences in anatomic structure existing between young and adult hair,2 the virulence and pathogenicity of the invading organism3 and changes in the hormonal activity of the glands occurring at adolescence.4 Detailed experimentation following each of these leads and including the various organisms in question would take one far beyond the scope of a single paper. This report therefore deals with but three common organisms chosen arbitrarily. It describes an attempt to demonstrate, by one method only, differences in the chemical contents of young and old hair and their possible influence on the cultural growth

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