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Article
February 1940

LXXXIII.—MALASSEZIA FURFUR, THE CAUSE OF TINEA VERSICOLORCULTIVATION OF THE ORGANISM AND EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTION OF THE DISEASE

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1940;41(2):253-260. doi:10.1001/archderm.1940.01490080062003
Abstract

The cultivation of Malassezia furfur, the fungus responsible for the disease pityriasis (tinea) versicolor, has been seldom accomplished, in spite of the large number of cells of the organism in the stratum corneum of the epidermis. After making several unsuccessful attempts, I finally cultured it and reported my work in a previous paper.1

It is the purpose of this communication to review briefly the characteristics of the organism in tissue and in culture and to give further data as to the experimental inoculation of the fungus into laboratory animals, human volunteers and the chorioallantoic membrane of the developing chick.

HISTORICAL REVIEW  Tinea versicolor was first recognized and demonstrated as a fungous infection by Eichstedt.2 In 1864 Köbner3 claimed to have transferred the fungus to his own skin and to that of rabbits. Hallier4 observed the growth of an organism which he first classified as an Aspergillus

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