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Article
February 1940

ACTION OF SULFUR-CONTAINING COMPOUNDS IN ARSENICAL AND MERCURIAL POISONINGWITH REVIEW OF THE USE OF SODIUM THIOSULFATE IN DERMATOLOGIC PRACTICE AND REPORT OF EXPERIMENTS ON RABBITS WITH SODIUM THIOSULFATE, SODIUM P-SULFHYDRIL PHENYL SULFONATE AND SODIUM FORMALDEHYDE SULFOXYLATE

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1940;41(2):308-330. doi:10.1001/archderm.1940.01490080117007
Abstract

One of the earliest sulfur-containing compounds to be recommended for use in combating arsphenamine reactions was a proprietary drug called "intramine" (diorthoaminothiobenzine), recommended by McDonough in 1916. According to Stokes,1 Fraser and Duncan employed contramine, a derivative of intramine, and Greenbaum obtained good results with thiosinamine in doses of 3 grains (0.19 Gm.) in 10 cc. of water administered intravenously every one or two days. In 1920 Ravaut2 noted that oxidation of the arsphenamines increased their toxicity in rabbits. He added sodium thiosulfate to the arsphenamine solution as a reducing agent to counteract the toxic effects of the oxidized material. He also used the drug in the treatment of arsphenamine dermatitis, which he believed might be due to the oxidized drug, and attributed the beneficial action of sodium thiosulfate to its reducing properties. He administered intravenously daily doses of 4 to 15 Gm. in a 20 per cent

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