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Article
March 1940

TREATMENT OF RAGWEED DERMATITIS: REPORT OF SEVEN CASES OF SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT WITH ABSOLUTE ALCOHOL EXTRACT OF RAGWEED LEAVES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA; MAHANOY CITY, PA.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1940;41(3):551-556. doi:10.1001/archderm.1940.01490090103013
Abstract

The first treatment of ragweed (contact) dermatitis was made in 1919. Hannah1 reported good results in a single instance with coseasonal injections of an aqueous extract of ragweed pollen. In the same year, Sutton2 reviewed 4 cases of the same condition, in 3 of which the patients were treated with a glycerin-phenol-saline solution extract of the pollen and showed decided improvement. However, none of these persons was given patch tests either with the oleoresin, which has since been proved to be the causative factor, or with ragweed leaves, which contain an abundance of the potent product. In 1930 Sulzberger and Wise3 noted improvement in 1 person following intradermal injections of water-soluble ragweed pollen antigen.

In 1931 Brown, Milford and Coca4 showed that ragweed (contact) dermatitis is due to the fat-soluble fraction of the plant or pollen rather than to the water-soluble fraction, which causes hay fever

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