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Article
May 1940

INFLUENCE OF SODIUM DEHYDROCHOLATE ON THERAPEUTIC ACTIVITY OF NEOARSPHENAMINEEXPERIMENTS WITH ACUTE TESTICULAR SYPHILIS OF RABBITS

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1940;41(5):838-841. doi:10.1001/archderm.1940.01490110024004
Abstract

It is now well known that the sodium salt of dehydrocholic acid (an oxidation product of cholic acid) is relatively nontoxic when given by intravenous injection and possesses decided cholagogue effects.1 This compound, which is available in the form of decholin sodium, has been advocated in a 5 per cent solution as a menstruum for the administration of arsphenamine and neoarsphenamine for the purpose of reducing the toxicity of these substances to the liver and for treating arsenical jaundice.

Savulesco2 reported that sodium dehydrocholate reduces the toxicity of arsphenamine in human beings, and Abelsohn3 stated that for 7 patients in whom jaundice developed during treatment with neoarsphenamine, treatment was successfully continued by giving subsequent injections of the compound in sodium dehydrocholate solution. Appel4 reported that intravenous administration of sodium dehydrocholate solution caused a prompt decrease of the icterus index and rapid recovery of 5 patients in

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