[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 1940

CULTURAL VARIATIONS OF TRICHOPHYTON PURPUREUM (BANG): WITH A DISCUSSION OF THE RECOGNIZABLE FEATURES

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1940;41(5):895-903. doi:10.1001/archderm.1940.01490110081012
Abstract

During the past three years we have isolated over 200 strains of Trichophyton purpureum from patients exhibiting cutaneous lesions which we have come to recognize collectively as a disease syndrome. The same types of lesions have been observed with sufficient frequency to point to the species of micro-organism. These cutaneous manifestations have been described in some detail.1 Various parts of the body may be affected. The chief sites of involvement are the feet and the hands. The micro-organism is a common cause of onychomycosis. Lesions in the groin are not uncommon. Glabrous cutaneous infections on the extremities or on the trunk are occasionally observed. In a few instances generalized eruptions have been seen. We have isolated T. purpureum from infections of the hair follicles on 5 occasions. Three of the patients had infections of the beard, and in 2 patients the infections were on the leg, in both instances

×