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Article
July 1940

PHILADELPHIA DERMATOLOGICAL SOCIETY

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1940;42(1):224-233. doi:10.1001/archderm.1940.01490130228026

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Abstract

A Flesh-Colored Paste to Camouflage Cutaneous Lesions. Presented by Dr. Joseph V. Klauder and Dr. Elmer R. Gross, Wilmington, Del.  Two patients with lupus erythematosus are presented to demonstrate that a paste has made their lesions considerably less apparent, with consequent improvement in appearance, making it possible for 1 of the patients to resume work. The formula of the paste, modified from that of E. Daubresse-Morelle (Rev. franç. de dermat. et de vénéréol.14:355, 1938), is as follows: (Powdered ochre [q. s.] may be added to make a darker shade.)One patient prefers this application to the proprietary "covermark," since the latter dried and cracked on the skin. Theatrical grease paint was tried but was discontinued, since it was greasy, rubbed off, did not absorb perspiration and was difficult to remove. None of these objections apply to the paste now being used.

DISCUSSION  Dr. Fred D. Weidman: Is there any difference in the satisfactoriness of the application in summer and in winter?Dr. Joseph V. Klauder: One can easily add a preservative to eliminate the possibility of bacterial action in summer.Ds. Fred D. Weidman: In the laboratory my associates and I use a mounting solution—Farrant's solution—which contains egg albumin, and in order to prevent decomposition we add arsenic. For other watery solutions we use thymol. Arsenic would not be altogether satisfactory as an ingredient of a face cream, but thymol might be satisfactory. In a mixture containing albumin it is necessary to inhibit the growth of micro-organisms.

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