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Article
September 1940

DERMATITIS DUE TO AQUAPHORReport of a Case

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1940;42(3):479-480. doi:10.1001/archderm.1940.01490150083015
Abstract

Aquaphor has been used and is used extensively in this country and abroad as an ointment base. It has several advantages over other ointment bases in that it keeps indefinitely and is readily miscible with three times its own weight of water. It is particularly suitable for application to the scalp on account of the ease with which it may be washed out of the hair. It is stated by the manufacturers that aquaphor is a mixture of a group of alcohols and esters of cholesterol obtained from wool fat, 6 parts, in a petrolatum base, 94 parts. The constituents of the mixture are melted together at a certain temperature.

No reports of dermatitis due to aquaphor have come to my notice in the literature. Several cases of sensitization to wool and to wool fat have been reported by Lord,1 Hertslet,2 Ramirez and Eller3 and Sulzberger and

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