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Article
April 1941

FIXED ERUPTIONS FROM VARIOUS DRUGS AND OTHER AGENTS: POLYVALENT SPECIFIC SENSITIVITY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Skin and Cancer Unit of the New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1941;43(4):672-677. doi:10.1001/archderm.1941.01490220068009
Abstract

The term fixed was introduced by Louis Brocq1 in 1894 to denote an unusual form of eruption that was produced by the ingestion of antipyrine. The chief characteristic of this eruption was that it recurred in the primarily affected area each time antipyrine was taken. Such lesions appeared usually as erythematous, pigmentary or erythematous vesiculobullous patches sometimes involving the mucosal orifices. The term fixed has been extended since then to various types of eruptions, whether urticarial, erythematous or eczematous, to conjunctival reactions and to motor and sensory disturbances and swellings (extracutaneous effects) that reappear as a result of the use of a drug or other agent, provided the exact site of the parent manifestation flared up each time.2 In this sense recurrent herpes, bromodermas, iododermas and the discoid type of lupus erythematosus may also be included in this category, provided a recurrence develops in the same area.

The

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