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Article
April 1941

ASCORBIC ACID AND ARSPHENAMINE DERMATITIS: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

AKRON, OHIO; CLEVELAND

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, Western Reserve University. The facilities of the Institute of Pathology of Western Reserve University were used in this study.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1941;43(4):682-688. doi:10.1001/archderm.1941.01490220078011
Abstract

Although Frei,1 in 1928, reported that he was able to produce cutaneous sensitivity to neoarsphenamine, there have been varied and conflicting reports on this phenomenon. The original work was confirmed in Germany by Mayer and Sulzberger,2 but one of these workers was subsequently unable in New York to confirm his own previous work and also noted great variations in the same work in two different cities in this country.3 Furthermore, it has been suggested that variations in the brand of neoarsphenamine might explain these conflicting reports.4 In 1931 it was reported that a greater percentage of guinea pigs were sensitizable during the winter than during the summer months,5 and the suggestion was offered that a dietary factor might play an important role.3 In fact, it has been reported that the substitution of ascorbic acid for greens offered protection against sensitization to neoarsphenamine.6 Since

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