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Article
May 1941

HERPES SIMPLEXA CASE OF AN UNUSUALLY EXTENSIVE, RECURRENT TYPE, APPARENTLY CURED AFTER AUTOSEROTHERAPY

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1941;43(5):817-821. doi:10.1001/archderm.1941.01490230057007
Abstract

Herpes simplex occurring in the absence of acute infections is not a particularly common disease and is often a source of great discomfort to its victims because of frequent recurrences. Almost any location of the body may be affected, chiefly, however, the mucocutaneous junctions, the face, the fingers, the buttocks and the external genitalia. The scalp and the trunk are considered fairly uncommon sites (Schönfeld1). Herpes simplex is most frequently found in young adults and in persons up to the fourth decade in age. The disease has a tendency to recur at the same or closely adjacent sites, often over periods of years. According to Schönfeld,1 simultaneous outbreaks on two different parts of the body are uncommon.

Herewith is reported a case of herpes simplex recurring at different sites on the body over a period of twelve years, involving during that time the arms, shoulders, flanks, buttocks, thighs

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