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Article
October 1941

COMBINED FUNGOUS INFECTIONS: REPORT OF SIX CASES WITH A REVIEW OF THIRTY-SIX CASES FROM THE LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology of the New York University College of Medicine, Service of Dr. Frank C. Combes.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1941;44(4):631-654. doi:10.1001/archderm.1941.01500040086008
Abstract

The simultaneous presence of two or more pathogenic microorganisms in the same patient is not rare as far as bacteria are concerned. The symbiosis of streptococci and staphylococci, a mixed ulcer with bacilli of Ducrey and Spirochaeta pallida, tuberculosis and syphilis in the same patient, or even in the same granulomatous lesion, are examples of combined bacterial infections.

Several nonpathogenic fungi, molds or yeasts often grow together in cultures of the skin, scales, hairs or nails. The association of one pathogenic fungus with other nonpathogenic types is also common. A true combined mycotic infection with two or more different pathogenic species present in the same person is, however, rare, in spite of the frequent occurrence of fungous diseases due to various fungi. This fact has been noted by many observers.

Bodin,1 who described a patient with trichophytosis and favus of the scalp, emphasized that instances of this condition were

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