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Article
November 1941

HISTAMINE IN TREATMENT OF ATOPIC DERMATOSES

Author Affiliations

EL PASO, TEXAS

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1941;44(5):883-890. doi:10.1001/archderm.1941.01500050113011
Abstract

The difficulties of the specific immunologic approach to the investigation and treatment of the cutaneous manifestations of atopy are such that any other approach which offers any hope of simplifying the problem is deserving of thorough study. The theory of Dale and Laidlaw1 seemed to offer some such hope. These authors, in 1918, advanced the theory that the allergic reaction is brought about by contact of specific allergens and antibodies in the tissue cells with liberation of histamine and that the histamine itself is responsible for the dilatation and increased permeability of the capillaries. This explanation seems to have been rather generally accepted. It is not certain, however, that the substance released in the tissues is actually histamine, and Lewis and Grant2 suggested the term "histamine-like" or "H substance" as a better designation. The explanation of allergy proposed by Dale and Laidlaw suggested the possibility of inducing hyposensitization

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