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Article
December 1941

SULFONATED OIL AS A DETERGENT: ITS USE IN A DERMATOLOGIC WARD

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1941;44(6):999-1008. doi:10.1001/archderm.1941.01500060018002
Abstract

There has been much interest among dermatologists in the new substitutes for soap as cleaning agents for the skin.1 One of these preparations, a sulfonated oil, has been under study in the dermatologic department of the Massachusetts General Hospital for the past four years. Enough preliminary work has been done with patch tests and the effects on the hands have been sufficiently satisfactory to warrant a wider use of the preparation in the treatment of various diseases of the skin.

Therefore during the year 1940 a sulfonated oil preparation2 was used with water as a detergent by all patients admitted to the dermatologic ward, of nineteen beds, at the Massachusetts General Hospital. This preparation has been described previously3 as a mixture of 25 per cent sulfonated mixed olive and teaseed oils, 25 per cent liquid petrolatum and 50 per cent water. It is miscible with water and

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