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Article
December 1941

THE KAHN VERIFICATION TEST: AN APPRAISAL OF THE TEST BASED ON CLINICAL AND SEROLOGIC EVIDENCE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology, Mount Sinai Hospital, and from the Central Social Hygiene Clinic of the Department of Health.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1941;44(6):1031-1050. doi:10.1001/archderm.1941.01500060050004
Abstract

As is well known, there are no truly specific tests for syphilis. The lipoids employed in the various tests are not antigens in the strict biologic sense. They are, however, capable of producing reactions which are diagnostic of syphilis to a high degree. Even the antigen made of cultured spirochetes, of which so much was expected, although somewhat more sensitive, cannot at present be looked on as far more specific than tissue extract antigens.1 All tests so far devised may give negative reactions in the presence of syphilis and positive reactions in its absence. While it is true that in most instances a positive serologic reaction is due to syphilis and perhaps represents a type of immunologic reaction, it is no less true that in some instances a positive reaction may be unrelated to the disease and represent a general biologic phenomenon. Stokes2 enumerated about thirty nonsyphilitic conditions

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