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Article
February 1942

NUTRITIONAL DERMATOSES IN THE RAT: V. SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS RESULTING FROM A DIET CONTAINING UNHEATED DRIED EGG WHITE AS THE SOURCE OF PROTEIN

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the Department of Biochemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1942;45(2):295-314. doi:10.1001/archderm.1942.01500080039003
Abstract

The use of egg white as a foodstuff for experimental animals had its origin in the nutritional investigations of the early part of this century, when biochemical research was concerned chiefly with the problem of nitrogen metabolism. The deleterious effects of unheated or uncoagulated egg white were gradually realized after numerous investigators had reported poor growth, loss of weight, hypochlorhydria, vomiting, diarrhea, "poor utilization," dermatitis, conjunctivitis, abscesses, diminished hemoglobin, spasticity, failure of lactation, nephritis and death in experimental animals from its use as the entire ration or as the source of protein in various diets.

In the course of experiments on phosphorus retention, Steinitz1 in 1898 observed that the ingestion of raw egg white by dogs caused vomiting and diarrhea. Falta and Noeggerath2 in 1905 were unable to maintain adult rats on diets containing dried egg white as the sole source of protein; conjunctivitis and subcutaneous abscesses developed

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