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Article
December 1942

CALCIUM, POTASSIUM AND SODIUM METABOLISM AND THE SKIN: THE USE OF POTASSIUM CHLORIDE IN CERTAIN ALLERGIC DERMATOSES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the departments of dermatology and physiology, University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1942;46(6):833-840. doi:10.1001/archderm.1942.01500180055008
Abstract

The administration of salts of potassium has been recently advocated for the treatment of urticaria and certain other allergic diseases.1 It has been known for a number of years that this element may have epinephrine-like effects under certain circumstances.2 The effective action of epinephrine in allergic states, therefore, is sufficient reason to prompt the trial of a potassium salt to combat them. It has been claimed3 that the blood potassium level rises during allergic attacks and recedes with improvement. The increase in the concentration of potassium of the blood has been thought to be contributed by the supply in the tissue cells. Some investigators4 have felt that if this current of potassium away from the cells could be reversed and the element driven back into them the accompanying allergic phenomena would be ameliorated. Accordingly, they have put this reasoning to trial, with conflicting results.4 For

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