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Article
April 1943

INJECTIONS OF GOLD SODIUM THIOSULFATE PLUS ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIATION: EFFECTS OF CONCURRENT INTRADERMAL OR INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTIONS OF GOLD SODIUM THIOSULFATE AND ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIATION ON EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology and the Institute of Pathology of Western Reserve School of Medicine and of the University Hospitals of Cleveland.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1943;47(4):478-485. doi:10.1001/archderm.1943.01500220016002
Abstract

The subject of chrysiasis, or gold pigmentation of the skin, following exposure to ultraviolet radiation has recently been reviewed.1 In all cases reported the condition followed intravenous injections of gold salts, principally sanocrysin (gold sodium thiosulfate), in large doses, totaling 150 mg. of gold sodium thiosulfate per kilogram of body weight or more. Whether this pigmentation might result from the intradermal or intramuscular administration of gold sodium thiosulfate has never been observed or experimentally tested. Schamberg,2 however, described pale blue staining of the skin of 1 patient and 1 rabbit following the subcutaneous infiltration of a colloidal gold solution.

Chrysiasis has not been produced in experimental animals, although intradermal and subcutaneous deposition of gold granules following the intravenous injection of massive doses of gold salts into mice, guinea pigs, rabbits and dogs3 has been shown histologically and chemically. Kochs4 experimentally produced local chrysiasis by the ultraviolet

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