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Article
April 1943

"RED MOSS" DERMATITIS: CONTACT WITH SPONGES AFFECTING OYSTERMEN

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA; CAMDEN, N. J.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1943;47(4):574-579. doi:10.1001/archderm.1943.01500220112010
Abstract

The book on occupational diseases of the skin, by Schwartz and Tulipan,1 contains a somewhat brief comment on various dermatoses which stem from work involving contact with sea life. Among these the vocation of oyster dredging and handling is not categorically mentioned. Of the diseases produced, erysipeloid (Rosenbach) and miscellaneous dermatoses of marine workers receive due attention as hazards of the fish and shellfish business. "The Fish Industry" is the heading of a section of the book which includes dermatoses derived from contact with various sea forms, most of them being free swimmers. Mention is made, however, of sponge fishers who are often stung by an anemone, a parasite on sponges. This sting is followed by immediate erythema and by blisters which develop within a few minutes. Evidently the primary irritant is of a severe nature, as in some cases multiple abscesses, sloughing and exfoliation of the skin occur.

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