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Article
June 1943

LENTIGINES: THEIR POSSIBLE SIGNIFICANCE

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Pediatric Department of the New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Columbia University (Dr. Adolph G. De Sanctis, director).

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1943;47(6):804-815. doi:10.1001/archderm.1943.01500240044008
Abstract

Despite the fact that most textbooks1 make no distinction between lentigines and freckles (ephelides), listing them as synonymous, many observers2 have noted distinct differences between them. Besides listing such differences, it is the purpose of this paper to show both age and seasonal variations in the number of lentigines and to discuss their possible clinical significance.

Lentigines are brown-pigmented lesions, darker than freckles, flat or raised, seen on all parts of the skin and present in almost every child and adult. They are absent at birth, usually appear about the second year of life and increase in number with age. They were so numerous on children with frequent colds in the pediatric clinic for diseases of the chest at the New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital that a survey was made covering a three year period, and variations in their numbers were recorded at intervals. The counts

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