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Article
October 1943

MYCOSIS FUNGOIDES WITH BULLOUS LESIONS: REPORT OF A CASE RESISTANT TO ROENTGEN AND ARSENICAL THERAPY; EFFECTS OF EMPIRIC THERAPY, PARTLY BASED ON LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1943;48(4):359-368. doi:10.1001/archderm.1943.01510040003001
Abstract

Bullous and vesicular lesions are occasionally encountered as intrinsic elements in such eruptions as lichen planus, leprosy and (more rarely) lupus erythematosus. As a conspicuous manifestation of eruptions of mycosis fungoides, they are extremely rare. Bullous and vesicular lesions sometimes become manifest as a result of interference with the circulation of lymph, giving rise to "wet" lesions of secondary nature, in contradistinction to the primary and essentially "dry" lesions. For example, bullous lesions occurring in association with Kaposi's idiopathic hemorrhagic sarcoma—a dry eruption—have been described1; these are secondary elements caused by blockage of the flow of lymph.

In the patient forming the subject of this report, the bullous lesions not only appeared at the site of clinically normal skin but arose—for the most part—from the midst of infiltrated nodules and plaques. Thus, the eruption was mistaken for pemphigus by several experienced dermatologists.

The evolution and involution of

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