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Article
December 1943

ACTUAL CAUSES OF CERTAIN OCCUPATIONAL DERMATOSES: A STUDY OF 527 CASES, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO DERMATOSES DUE TO MINERAL OILS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1943;48(6):579-600. doi:10.1001/archderm.1943.01510060003001
Abstract

A study was made of 1,113 cases of cutaneous diseases in patients observed by me who presented claims for compensation under the Pennsylvania law. My purpose was to determine outstanding causal factors of occupational dermatoses, in order to discuss these factors by groups in relation to a practical outline of teaching occupational dermatoses.1

Of the 1,113 patients 909 were males and 204 were females. The diseases of 527 were diagnosed as occupational2 in origin and those of 586 as nonoccupational. These figures do not include conditions encountered during the inspection of employees at various plants.

The nonoccupational group comprised thirty-nine different diseases of the skin. The most frequent were: eczematous dermatitis, tinea of the hands and feet, pyoderma, pityriasis rosea, miliaria, seborrheic dermatitis, lichen planus, urticaria, herpes zoster and erythema multiforme. Such diseases as syphilis (early and late lesions), pemphigus vulgaris and lupus erythematosus were observed.

Diagnosis

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