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Article
December 1943

DERMATITIS DUE TO NAIL POLISH: REPORT OF TWO CASES, WITH EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; ALBANY, N. Y.; NEW YORK

From the Skin and Cancer Unit, New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Columbia University.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1943;48(6):612-615. doi:10.1001/archderm.1943.01510060036005
Abstract

In a recent review of the subject of dermatitis due to nail polish, Osborne and his co-workers1 detailed their clinical observations in 100 cases of this disease encountered by them since 1926. They stressed the increasing incidence in the past three years. It is probable that the frequency of nail polish dermatitis can now be counted in the hundreds, if not in the thousands. Because the female population is being exposed to such mass sensitization (occasional examples are also encountered in men using colorless nail polish), the subject has become important. Simon2 found that the cause of this dermatitis is a "formaldehyde-sulfonamide resin."

The protocols of the following 2 cases provide data bearing on some points of fundamental interest. Among these are: 1. Does nail polish cause a generalized hypersensitivity of the skin? 2. If such generalized hypersensitivity of the skin occurs, does it involve all parts

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