[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 1944

NUTRITIONAL DERMATOSES IN THE RAT: X. A COMPARISON OF DISSEMINATED NEURODERMATITIS AND EXPERIMENTAL MAGNESIUM DEFICIENCY

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; BALTIMORE

From the Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the Department of Biochemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health.

Aided by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation Fluid Research Fund.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1944;49(1):33-45. doi:10.1001/archderm.1944.01510070036007
Abstract

When young rats are fed an otherwise adequate diet which contains insufficient magnesium there develops a disease characterized by hyperexcitability, tonic-clonic convulsive seizures, nephritis, hepatitis, vasodilatation, intense generalized erythema, edema of the skin, erythema multiforme, dermatitis, ulcers, hyperflexibility and hyperextensibility of the joints, edema of the dependent parts and finally nutritive failure and death.1 Magnesium deficiency in calves results in the deposition of calcium salts in the yellow elastic fibers of the endocardium, of the aorta, jugular vein and larger arteries, of the surfaces of the diaphragm and of the trabeculae of the spleen.2 Clinicians generally have lacked interest in magnesium deficiency and have neglected to explore the possibilities of its clinical significance. The clinical implications suggested by the experimental syndrome include tetany,1 epilepsy,3 arteriosclerosis,2 nephrosis4 and disseminated neurodermatitis.5 In this communication disseminated neurodermatitis is compared with

×