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Article
February 1944

RINGWORM OF THE SCALP: VI. SUCCESSFUL USE OF ROENTGEN RAYS TO EPILATE LOCAL AREAS OF INFECTION

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1944;49(2):107-108. doi:10.1001/archderm.1944.01510080019003
Abstract

In most dermatologic departments, roentgen epilation is routine treatment for the resistant types of tinea capitis. The usual five exposure method came into use prior to the discovery that hairs infected with fungi are fluorescent when examined under filtered ultraviolet irradiation. It is known that some spreading of the infection following exposure to roentgen rays is apt to occur, particularly during the third week. It is also a frequent observation that minimal lesions, detectable under the Wood light, may not be clinically recognizable. Because of these facts the traditional five exposure method has heretofore been retained as standard procedure, although MacKee1 has stated that "for various reasons it is preferable at times to limit the treatment to one or more circumscribed areas." It occurred to us that the five exposure method might not be necessary in cases of localized infection provided the localization was accurately determined by

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