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Article
February 1944

CUTANEOUS AUTOSENSITIZATION: ROLE OF STAPHYLOCOCCI IN CHRONIC ECZEMA OF THE HANDS

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Dermatological Division of the Medical Clinic and the Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute, the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1944;49(2):124-127. doi:10.1001/archderm.1944.01510080036009
Abstract

In 1896 Darier1 coined the term "tuberculid." He used it to designate a group of morphologically different cutaneous syndromes which were generally recognized to be associated with tuberculosis. The term was accepted and persisted and today has a definite meaning clinically and pathologically. In general, a tuberculid may be said to be an allergic cutaneous manifestation of systemic tuberculosis. The cutaneous lesions seldom contain demonstrable tubercle bacilli and are thought to be caused either by circulating toxin or by showers of dead or attenuated tubercle bacilli emanating from a focus of active tuberculous infection elsewhere in the body; the infected person almost always presents a positive reaction following the intracutaneous injection of old tuberculin.

The "id" suffix was adopted in 1902 by Audry2 in manufacturing another new term, "leukemid." He called attention to a heterogeneous group of nonspecific, pruriginous, urticarial, exudative and

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