[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1944

BEHCET'S SYNDROME WITH INVOLVEMENT OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM: REPORT OF A CASE, WITH NECROPSY, OF LESIONS OF THE MOUTH, GENITALIA AND EYES; REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

TEL AVIV, PALESTINE

From the Department of Dermatology, Municipal Hospital Hadassa.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1944;49(4):227-233. doi:10.1001/archderm.1944.01510100003001
Abstract

In 1937 the Turkish dermatologist Hulusi Behcet1 described a new clinical syndrome characterized by recurrent attacks of aphtha-like lesions in the mouth and on the genitalia and ocular changes. Two patients, a man and a woman, were observed who for nineteen and seven years respectively had suffered from these attacks. Many differential diagnoses were considered and ruled out, and as the picture could not be fitted into that of any known disease the author suggested a new clinical entity. In the smears from the lesions elementary bodies were found with Herzberg's victoria blue stain and Giemsa stain which resembled the elementary bodies of variola, and the belief was expressed that this new syndrome was of virus origin. Shortly after the publication of the first case, 3 other cases were observed, and on July 14, 1938 the Turkish Dermatologic Society2 devoted a special session to the new

×