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Article
May 1944

DERMAL MYIASIS: REPORT OF THREE CASES

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1944;49(5):309-311. doi:10.1001/archderm.1944.01510110007002
Abstract

Myiasis is a term meaning an invasion by fly maggots of the organs or tissues of animals, including man. Such invasions may be benign or may result in more or less violent disturbances, even in death. According to the site of invasion one may have intestinal, gastric, urinary, nasal or auricular myiasis (otomyiasis). Invasion of the eyes is called ophthalmomyiasis; when wounds or ulcers are invaded the disease is termed traumatic dermal myiasis; invasion of the skin is also known as cutaneous myiasis.

There are various species of Diptera, belonging to the families Oestridae, Gasterophyllidae and Cuterebridae, which are specifically myiasis producing, i. e., are obligatory sarcobionts, such as the bot flies and warble flies, Dermatobia hominis (Linnaeus), Gasterophilus intestinalis (DeGeer) and Hypoderma bovis (DeGeer). The more serious myiasis-producing flies are the flesh flies belonging to the family Metopiidae (including Calliphoridae, Sarcophagida and others) and the Muscidae.

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