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Article
June 1944

INTENSIVE AMBULATORY THERAPY OF SYPHILIS: THIRTY DAY MAPHARSEN TECHNIC

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1944;49(6):403-407. doi:10.1001/archderm.1944.01510120017003
Abstract

Since the introduction of arsphenamine in the treatment of syphilis, many technics of abortive or intensive therapy have been proposed. Most of these methods have been rejected either because of inherent toxicity or because a "test of time" evaluation has demonstrated therapeutic failure.

This "test of time" evaluation of the results of therapy for syphilis is complicated by the characteristic long latent period and by the tendency of the disease to heal spontaneously in an unknown percentage of cases. Increased longevity resulting from the control of formerly fatal inter-current diseases permits the later development of clinical and laboratory manifestations of syphilis in a group of patients who were formerly thought cured.

In the attempt to establish for syphilis a therapy of short duration which would rapidly render the patient noninfectious and be relatively nontoxic and potentially curative, Chargin and his associates1 in 1933 devised an

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