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Article
June 1944

CUTANEOUS ABSORPTION: II. THE VALUE OF PETROLATUM, ANHYDROUS WOOL FAT AND OTHER BASES IN PERCUTANEOUS ABSORPTION OF TOPICALLY APPLIED COTTONSEED ALLERGEN

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology and the Department of Allergy of the Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1944;49(6):427-431. doi:10.1001/archderm.1944.01510120041010
Abstract

In a previous communication1 it was demonstrated that proteins, such as cottonseed, when applied topically are absorbed through the skin of human beings and of monkeys. In that study a site on the skin of the subject to be tested was passively sensitized to cottonseed antigen. After twenty-four to forty-eight hours, the antigen, suspended in a grease base, was rubbed in at another cutaneous site. The development of a wheal at the sensitized site marked the entrance of detectable amounts of antigen into the circulation.

The serum for sensitization was obtained from a patient strongly sensitive to cottonseed and with an extremely high titer of reagins for this antigen (1: 512 by the dilution method of Coca and Grove2). The serum was used in a dilution of 1:4 in human subjects and undiluted in monkeys. From 0.05 to 0.1 cc. was injected intracutaneously for local passive

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