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Article
July 1944

DERMATITIS FROM LEMON GRASS OIL (CYMBOPOGON CITRATUS OR ANDROPOGON CITRATUS)

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, New York University College of Medicine, and the Dermatologie Service of the Third (New York University) Medical Division, Bellevue Hospital, service of Dr. Frank C. Combes.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1944;50(1):34-35. doi:10.1001/archderm.1944.01510130037010
Abstract

Dermatitis has been reported from contact with many plants and grasses, but, to the best of my knowledge, there have been no reports in the literature of dermatitis caused by lemon grass oil. In the lists of cutaneous irritants, including those from tropical plants, prepared by J. C. White1 and by Weber,2 lemon grass oil does not appear. V. Pardo-Castello, in his report on dermatitis venenata due to tropical plants,3 did not mention lemon grass oil, nor did Prosser White4 record an instance of dermatitis due to this oil. Peck5 stated that the Dermatoses Investigations Section of the United States Public Health Service has no information "about dermatitis from these grasses or their oils, including citronella."

Lemon grass oil is described by the "Dispensatory of the United States of America"6 as follows:

It "is the oil distilled from Cymbopogon citratus, Stapf, and

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