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Article
August 1944

CONTACT TESTING OF THE BUCCAL MUCOUS MEMBRANE FOR STOMATITIS VENENATA

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI; DENTAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology of the College of Medicine of the University of Cincinnati.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1944;50(2):79-84. doi:10.1001/archderm.1944.01510140002001
Abstract

Many investigators1 have noted the low incidence of contact stomatitis as compared with the high incidence of contact dermatitis. Moreover, it is uncommon for a patient with extensive contact dermatitis of the face and even with a contact cheilitis to have an associated contact stomatitis. Furthermore, persons may take medicaments by mouth and may acquire extensive vesicular dermatitis, with positive reactions to patch tests, but often with no apparent lesions of the mucous membranes. Some examples of these substances are quinine, sulfathiazole and poison ivy oleoresin. This clinical fact of the relative resistance of the buccal mucous membrane to the development of eczematous lesions has not been studied in great detail.

Among the detailed reports in the literature of stomatitis venenata have been those of Shelmire2 and Silvers3 on poison ivy, Bircher4 on primula obconica, Loveman5 on oil of anise, Rattner

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