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Article
September 1944

ERYSIPELOTHRIX RHUSIOPATHIAE INFECTION IN SWINE AND IN HUMAN BEINGS: COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE CUTANEOUS LESIONS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1944;50(3):151-159. doi:10.1001/archderm.1944.01510150003001
Abstract

My previous studies of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection in man (erysipeloid of Rosenbach) concerned bacteriologic, epidemiologic, clinical and chemotherapeutic phases of the disease.1

The purpose of this study is a comparison of the cutaneous lesions of the infection in swine2 and in human beings. This infection affords an opportunity for study of comparative dermatology, since the disease in swine is prevalent and cutaneous lesions are common. Moreover, the skin of swine more nearly resembles human skin than does that of any other animal.

ERYSIPELOTHRIX RHUSIOPATHIAE INFECTION IN SWINE

The infection in swine is manifested in three forms: a severe, or septicemic, form, characterized by constitutional symptoms of septicemia, presence of diffuse areas of erythema and at times vesicles, petechiae and necrosis; a mild form (urticarial form, or "diamond skin" disease), characterized by mild constitutional symptoms and presence of sharply circumscribed quadrangular lesions on

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