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Article
March 1945

CUTANEOUS DISEASES IN THE TROPICS: A CLINICAL STUDY BASED ON OBSERVATIONS IN MALAYA

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;51(3):163-171. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510210005001
Abstract

Cutaneous manifestations seen in Malays, Indians, Chinese and Caucasians in the four Federated Malay States and on the island of Penang during the years 1939 to 1941 form the basis of this paper.

Most of the Malays lived in rural areas. Their main occupation was agriculture and fishing. The Chinese were predominant in towns as shopkeepers and traders. In rural areas they worked as laborers in tin mines. The Indians were mostly immigrants from southern India; the majority were Tamils, but there were also Telegus and Uriahs. Tamils constituted the main body of laborers in the rubber industry. The white persons examined were government officers and their families, managers of rubber estates, supervisors of tin dredges and police and custom officers in the Federated Malay States.

The cutaneous manifestations will be presented in three large groups according to their causation: external causes, nutritional deficiencies and

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