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Article
March 1945

ENDOCRINE INFLUENCE ON THE RADIOSENSITIVITY OF THE SKIN AND THE THYROID

Author Affiliations

Research Associate in Radiology BROOKLYN

From the Department of Radiology, Long Island College of Medicine.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;51(3):198-199. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510210040009
Abstract

Endocrine influence on the sensitivity of the human skin to roentgen rays was recognized early in the history of roentgen therapy. The increased radiosensitivity of the skin of patients with hyperthyroidism soon became a matter of concern to the radiotherapeutist. Careful studies of cutaneous sensitivity to roentgen rays, conducted to establish a more definite skin unit dose, brought to light many other conditions, such as the increased radiosensitivity of the skin premenstrually and during pregnancy and changes in radiosensitivity at puberty (Flaskamp1). All of these conditions definitely pointed to the importance of the sex glands as factors determining cutaneous resistance to radiation. In general it can be said that certain organic and constitutional diseases, especially those affecting the vasomotor system or the sympathetic nervous system (MacKee2), influence the radiosensitivity of the skin. It is noteworthy that the same conditions exercise similar effects with respect to

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