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Article
April 1945

HERPES ZOSTER GENERALISATUS ASSOCIATED WITH CHRONIC LYMPHATIC LEUKEMIA

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Dermatology and Syphilology, Mayo Foundation; ROCHESTER, MINN.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;51(4):263-265. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510220037008
Abstract

Herpes zoster in its common form, involving one side of the body and manifested by grouped umbilicated vesicles on an erythematous base, is a disease which many patients are able to diagnose.

Often, in addition to the zonal distribution of the herpes zoster eruption, umbilicated vesicles ranging in number from five to thirty may appear at various sites remote from the initial lesions, usually concurrently on the trunk. These widespread lesions were first described by Tenneson,1 in 1893, as vesicules aberrantes. He concluded that 90 per cent of patients who had herpes zoster presented these lesions, an opinion not shared by Barker.2 Bluefarb and Morris3 found them in 66 per cent of their patients.

A rarer manifestation of herpes zoster is known as herpes zoster generalisatus, in which scores or even hundreds of umbilicated vesicles appear in a widely generalized distribution over the body in conjunction

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