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Article
June 1945

CUTANEOUS REACTIONS OF PERSONS WITH ATOPIC ECZEMA TO HUMAN DANDER: RESULTS OF PATCH TESTS ON SCARIFIED SKIN

Author Affiliations

LOUISVILLE, KY.

From the Departments of Medicine and of Bacteriology and Immunology of the University of Louisville School of Medicine.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;51(6):402-404. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510240048010
Abstract

The presence of allergenic activity in human dander has been reported by Van Leeuwen and his co-workers,1 Keller2 and Hampton and Cooke3 and has been discussed several times by Sulzberger. Most allergists, however, have expressed doubt that human dander is allergenic for man.

Human dander is a complex mixture of cornified epidermal cells, sebum, sweat and numerous micro-organisms, as well as various dust particles and other material. In recent studies I4 presented evidence confirming the existence of an allergen for man in human dander. The allergen investigated was found to be separate and distinct from the allergens in feathers, wool, orris, house dust, cottonseed, karaya gum, bluegrass and ragweed pollen. It was found in dander and hair from the scalp but was not detected in scales of skin from the general body surface or in hair, other contents or inner lining of a

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