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Article
July 1945

DERMATOLOGIC PRACTICE IN A STATION HOSPITAL IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA: A COMPARISON WITH PRIVATE PRACTICE

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;52(1):21-25. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510250026008
Abstract

It should be obvious that practice of medicine in the Army differs from that in civilian life. The reasons for this are multiple. Even if the factors of trauma and tropical dermatoses are eliminated, the cutaneous diseases studied in an Army hospital are not identical with those seen in peacetime. The type of patient observed determines the cutaneous changes encountered. In the Service, one is dealing with healthy young men. Therefore, one should expect an increase in the diseases commonest in this group, with an absolute or relative absence of dermatoses peculiar to children, women and persons of advanced age. The relatively crowded living facilities would be expected to encourage the spread of contagious diseases. The dermatologist would be called on to treat certain dermatoses seldom seen in his civilian practice, including, as an example, sunburn. This is due to the fact that persons with sunburn are

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