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Article
July 1945

ERYTHEMA NODOSUM IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY: The Case of the Child Mozart

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;52(1):33-34. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510250038013
Abstract

To the Editor:—The belief has often been voiced that Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), one of the greatest musical geniuses of all times, suffered from tuberculosis of the lungs. This opinion is based on such meager evidence as the belief of one of his first biographers, G. N. von Niessen,1 who married Mozart's young widow, or on the vaguely noted observations that Mozart was a sickly child, that he often suffered from colds and catarrh and that he was always tired and close to exhaustion.2 The cause of his early death, according to the death certificate, was "miliary fever." However, according to a medical expert of the early nineteenth century, it was "meningitis,"2b and according to J. Barraud,3 who in the early twentieth century collected all the data available on the symptoms and signs of Mozart's last illness, it was Bright's disease. The story

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