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Article
August 1945

SEMBLANCE OF ELASTIC TISSUE TO MYCELIUM IN POTASSIUM HYDROXIDE PREPARATIONS

Author Affiliations

GREENWOOD, MISS.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;52(2):115. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510260045010

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Abstract

The novice in the field of medical mycology may be readily deceived by potassium hydroxide preparations of shavings of skin which extend down into the corium.

Such specimens contain elastic tissue fibers which withstand digestion by potassium hydroxide and heat. The usual types of specimens examined in dermatologic practice, such as scales, scrapings and peelings of epidermis alone, naturally do not contain elastic tissue.

Under low power, high dry or oil immersion magnification, the elastic tissue fibers appear to be a dense mycelium of fine, nonseptate, intertwining and branching hyphae. Although elastic tissue fibers are known to vary in thickness from a fraction of a micron to as much as 11 microns in diameter, they appear deceptively uniform in potassium hydroxide wet mounts. The fluorescence of the elastic tissue fibers under ultraviolet radiation may serve further to confuse the observer. Nothing resembling spores

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