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Article
October 1945

A NEW CUTANEOUS SYNDROME OCCURRING IN NEW GUINEA AND ADJACENT ISLANDS: PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;52(4):221-225. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510280005001
Abstract

While serving for the past two years in the United States Army as a dermatologic consultant in two of its large bases in the Southwest Pacific, I had an excellent opportunity to observe different types of cutaneous diseases occurring in troops living under field conditions in the tropics.

My first station was in a base section which included practically all the tropical part of Northern Australia, where a large number of United States troops were concentrated at the time. The headquarters of this base section was an important hospitalization center, receiving not only all patients from organizations in the immediate vicinity but those evacuated from New Guinea.

The type and incidence of disease of the skin seen in the troops and civilians living in that area were approximately the same as would be encountered in similar groups in the United States. There were numerous cases of so-called Barcoo

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