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Article
October 1945

PENICILLIN OINTMENT: STUDIES ON STABILITY RELATIVE TO POTENCY AND ON THE SENSITIVITY OF THE HUMAN SKIN TO PATCH TESTS WITH OINTMENT

Author Affiliations

(MC), U.S.N.R.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;52(4):246. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510280030005
Abstract

The literature has shown an increasing utilization of penicillin in several forms in the treatment of diseases of the skin. With its use, many types of cutaneous disease have shown a surprising response. Fleming1 reported that in the laboratory he found penicillin about ten times as effective as sulfathiazole as an antibacterial agent. Clark, Colebrook, Gibson and Thompson2 applied penicillin in the form of a cream to fifty-four burns and scalds in various stages of healing with a view to the elimination of hemolytic streptococci, and in 76 per cent of the wounds these organisms disappeared within five days and did not reappear. There were no cases in which the application of penicillin appeared to have no effect. Healings were unusually rapid, and no toxic effects were observed.

Experiments have demonstrated that penicillin in a liquid form loses its potency on stand

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