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Article
November 1945

EPIDERMOLYSIS BULLOSA: A SUGGESTION AS TO POSSIBLE CAUSATION

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;52(5):317-321. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510290022002
Abstract

Epidermolysis bullosa, a comparatively rare dermatosis, was first recognized as an entity in 1879 by Tilbury Fox.1 Goldscheider,2 three years later, gave it the name it bears at the present time. Since then most observers have classified the disease into two main groups, namely the simple and the dystrophic forms. The simple form is characterized by the appearance of bullae on the skin, usually without changes in other ectodermal structures such as the teeth, hair and nails, whereas the changes in these appendages is the predominant feature of the dystrophic form. The dystrophic form of the disease has been further subdivided into two types based on hereditary transmission, as a dominant or as a recessive characteristic. Clinically, the dominant dystrophic type is intermediate in severity between the simple and the recessive dystrophic type. The nails may be thickened, clawlike, or absent, but as a rule

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