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Article
November 1945

PIGMENTATION OF HAIR ON TRANSPLANTED SKIN IN HOODED RATS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Departments of Anatomy, College of Dentistry and the Graduate School of Arts and Science, New York University.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;52(5):347-350. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510290052009
Abstract

While making some studies on the pigmentation of hair in piebald rats and exchanging areas of skin producing black hair with areas having white hair, my colleagues and I noted that the skin which formerly grew black hair often produced white hair in its new environment. In other rats areas of skin producing black hair were then incised and sutured back in their original sites, and they often produced white hair. The latter experiments showed that the white hair on the transplants was due to changes resulting from the operation rather than to the environment.

These results differed from the observations made on guinea pigs by Seevers and Spencer,1 who found in 52 sucessful grafts that transplantation of skin from a colored area to a white area showed that the hair follicles do not lose their pigment-producing potentialities in an unpigmented area.

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