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Article
November 1945

SANDALS, AND HYGIENE AND INFECTIONS OF THE FEET

Author Affiliations

SANITARY CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; AIR CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Physiological Projects Section, Proof Division, Army Air Forces Proving Ground Command.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;52(5):365-368. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510290070012
Abstract

The high incidence of cutaneous diseases of the feet due to infection and hyperhidrosis among military personnel in tropical and summer temperate climates greatly interferes with the efficient performance of military functions. The extent and severity of such infection are not generally realized. Moreover, the problem in the tropics is not peculiar to the army, and return of infected personnel may bring it into sharp focus in this country. Various estimates give the percentage of Army and Navy personnel free from clinical evidence of infection of the feet at only 20 per cent; estimates for civilian industrial populations show only a slightly better situation. Callaway1 has stated that "no effective fungicide is yet available which does not have certain disadvantages . . . most prescribed remedies depend not on their fungicidal action but on keratolytic action." Hopkins1 pointed out that "almost any agent that is fungistatic

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