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Article
November 1945

THE ADRENAL GLANDS IN PEMPHIGUS VULGARISREPORT OF SIX AUTOPSIES AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;52(5):369-375. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510290074013
Abstract

Although the literature dealing with pemphigus is extensive, the greatest proportion relates to therapy or etiologic investigations; only a small fraction concerns itself with the pathology, pathophysiology or histochemistry of this disease. Biochemical changes were noted as far back as 1872, when Krieger1 remarked on the absence of urinary chlorides in 1 case. In the last decade a great deal of study has been devoted to the changes in electrolyte metabolism.2 This work, however, was of more or less academic interest until Talbott, Lever and Consolazio3 called attention to the fact that the electrolyte pattern, particularly in cases of acute pemphigus, was almost identical with that observed in cases of acute adrenal insufficiency. The therapeutic consequences of these observations apparently mark a great step forward in the treatment of certain types of pemphigus. Goldman,4 Goldzieher,5 Gellis and Glass6 and Talbott

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