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Article
November 1945

CUTANEOUS AND SUBCUTANEOUS LESIONS OF THE LOWER LIMBS IN CONNECTION WITH THE VEINS: DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Skin and Cancer Unit, New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Columbia University.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;52(5):376-383. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510290081014
Abstract

In a great many dermatoses the limitation of eruptions to certain areas is often dependent on the distribution of the blood vessels in these regions. The relationship manifests itself either in an increased susceptibility to localized outbreaks or, more rarely, in a tendency to suppression.1 This observation can be substantiated by demonstration of cutaneous lesions in close proximity to superficial visible veins (fig. 1) or to subcutaneous palpable veins. Infra-red photography2 or phlebography3 reveals the relationship between cutaneous lesions and concealed venous channels. The topographic coincidence may be visualized on any part of the body, but it is more apparent in areas with prevalent vascular disturbances, as, for example, on the lower extremities where, owing to generally unfavorable mechanical conditions, congestion easily develops. Hemostasis, even of slight degree, favors the appearance of cutaneous eruptions on the legs. The aggravation of

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