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Article
January 1946

TYROTHRICIN IN CUTANEOUS INFECTIONS

Author Affiliations

LONG BEACH, CALIF.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1946;53(1):20-25. doi:10.1001/archderm.1946.01510300023005
Abstract

Since the time of Pasteur, scientists have been interested in the subject of intermicrobial antagonism. A large number of articles on the subject have been written. Waksman and Woodruff1 divided the group of antagonists so far described into four distinct groups: (1) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Bacterium pyocyaneum), Pseudomonas fluorescens and related organisms; (2) spore-forming bacteria; (3) actinomycetes (actinomycetin), and (4) fungi (penicillin). Dubos,2 reviewing the subject, dealt with three examples of this type of antagonism—namely, pyocyanase, penicillin and tyrothricin, which he selected because their mode of action is fairly well understood. The object of this paper is to review some of the work done with one of the group, tyrothricin, and to present experiences with the material in the treatment of cutaneous infections up to the present time.

HISTORICAL

In 1939 Dubos3 first reported results of his study with a bactericidal substance found in

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