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Article
January 1946

LOCALIZED SENSITIVITY TO CRUDE PENICILLIN: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

On leave of absence from the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Dr. John H. Stokes, Director.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1946;53(1):31-33. doi:10.1001/archderm.1946.01510300034007
Abstract

In October 1943 Robinson and Wallace1 reported on the use of penicillin-inoculated gauze pads for topical application in the treatment of various superficial infections. Since that time there has been considerable use of crude penicillin in compresses and in ointment bases for the treatment of superficial pyogenic dermatologie diseases. In a recent discussion one investigator,2 reporting encouraging results from the treatment of acute and of chronic pyogenic infections of the skin, stated: "Up to the present there has been no serious reaction reported following the local or parenteral use of penicillin. . . . Its absence of local reaction and sensitivity places the mold in a unique situation in comparison with the sulfonamide compounds."

Evidence is accumulating, however, to indicate that the use of penicillin locally is not wholly unattended with untoward responses. In July 1944 a case of dermatitis venenata of the face and genitalia from contact with purified penicillin was reported.3 The patient was a medical officer who prepared various

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